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Are Future Constructors Experiencing a Warm Climate? An Initial Study of Citizenship Status and Affective Engagement

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Conference

2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Tampa, Florida

Publication Date

June 15, 2019

Start Date

June 15, 2019

End Date

June 19, 2019

Conference Session

ConstDiv Technical Session 3 - Social & Leadership

Tagged Division

Construction Engineering

Page Count

21

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/32103

Download Count

4

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Paper Authors

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Denise Rutledge Simmons P.E. University of Florida Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-3401-2048

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Denise R. Simmons, Ph.D., PE, LEED-AP, is an associate professor in the Department of Civil and Coastal Engineering in the Herbert Wertheim College of Engineering at the University of Florida. She holds a B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in civil engineering and a graduate certificate in engineering education – all from Clemson University. She has over ten years of construction and civil engineering experience working for energy companies and as a project management consultant.

Dr. Simmons has extensive experience leading and conducting multi-institutional, workforce-related research and outreach. She is a leader in research investigating the competencies professionals need to compete in and sustain the construction workforce. She oversees the Simmons Research Lab (SRL), which is home to a dynamic, interdisciplinary mix of graduate researchers who work together to explore human, technological and societal interactions to transform civil engineering practice with an emphasis on understanding hazard recognition, competencies, satisfaction, personal resilience, organizational culture, training and social considerations.

As a researcher, Dr. Simmons passionately pursues workforce research characterizing, expanding, sustaining, measuring and training the technical and professional construction workforce in the US. The broader impact of this work lies in achieving and sustaining safe, productive, diverse, and inclusive project organizations composed of engaged, competent and diverse people.

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Adam Kirn University of Nevada, Reno

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Adam Kirn is an Assistant Professor of Engineering Education at University of Nevada, Reno. His research focuses on the interactions between engineering cultures, student motivation, and their learning experiences. His projects involve the study of student perceptions, beliefs and attitudes towards becoming engineers, their problem solving processes, and cultural fit. His education includes a B.S. in Biomedical Engineering from Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, a M.S. in Bioengineering and Ph.D. in Engineering and Science Education from Clemson University.

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Rodolfo Valdes-Vasquez Colorado State University

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Rodolfo Valdes-Vasquez is an Associate Professor in the Department of Construction Management at Colorado State University. He is committed to advancing research and teaching in the sustainability of infrastructure projects. He believes that educating the next generation of professionals will play a pivotal role in making sustainability a standard practice.

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Nelson S. Pearson University of Nevada, Reno

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Nelson Pearson is an Ph.D. student at the University of Nevada, Reno. His research interest includes, social networks and the integration of diverse populations, engineering culture as well as engineering pedagogy. His education includes a B.S. and M.S. in Civil Engineering from the University of Nevada, Reno.

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Abstract

This study explores the differences in student perceptions of academic discipline belonging (ADB) and peer interactions (PI) for students from different citizenship backgrounds and who are also majoring in Civil Engineering and Building Construction programs. A quantitative, causal-comparative study (n = 397) was conducted using the Postsecondary Student Engagement (PosSE) Survey. The survey included participants from sophomore to senior levels. Analysis of the survey data includes two-way ANOVAs. ANOVA results indicated that student citizenship status is a significant factor for ADB and PI. Further, results indicated that permanent residents had significantly more positive perceptions of academic discipline belonging and peer interactions than other groups, while naturalized citizens had significantly lower perceptions. The significance of this study lays on it being one of the few quantitative studies focusing on civil engineering and building construction students’ affective engagement.

Simmons, D. R., & Kirn, A., & Valdes-Vasquez, R., & Pearson, N. S. (2019, June), Are Future Constructors Experiencing a Warm Climate? An Initial Study of Citizenship Status and Affective Engagement Paper presented at 2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Tampa, Florida. https://peer.asee.org/32103

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