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Argumentation in K-12 Engineering Education: A Review of the Literature (Fundamental)

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Conference

2018 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Publication Date

June 23, 2018

Start Date

June 23, 2018

End Date

July 27, 2018

Conference Session

Modeling, Inquiry, Engineering Literacy & Argumentation

Tagged Division

Pre-College Engineering Education

Page Count

12

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/29816

Download Count

97

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Paper Authors

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Amy Wilson-Lopez Utah State University

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Amy Wilson-Lopez is an associate professor at Utah State University who studies culturally responsive engineering and literacy-infused engineering with linguistically diverse students.

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Christina Marie Sias Utah State University

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Christina Sias is a PhD. student at Utah State University

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Ashley R. Strong

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Jared W. Garlick Utah State University

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Jared Garlick is a Graduate Student in the Secondary Education Master's of Education (MEd) program through the Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services. Research interests include argumentation in science and engineering and the benefit they play in developing literacy in specific content areas.

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Angela Minichiello P.E. Utah State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-4545-9355

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Angela Minichiello is an assistant professor in the Department of Engineering Education at Utah State University and a registered professional mechanical engineer. Her research examines issues of access, diversity, and inclusivity in engineering education. In particular, she is interested in professional formation, engineering problem-solving, and the intersections of online learning and alternative pathways for adult, nontraditional, and veteran undergraduates in engineering.

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Jorge Americo Acosta Feliz Utah State University

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Sandra Weingart

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Abstract

According to the Common Core State Standards, middle and high students should engage in argumentation in social studies, science, and “technical subjects” such as engineering. In affirmation of this stance, the Next Generation Science Standards likewise recommended argumentation as a core practice of engineering. Despite this emphasis on argumentation in national standards, very little is known about the features of engineering-related student arguments or argumentation instruction in K-12 classrooms. The purpose of this literature review (which was conducted as a sub-component of a larger systematic review on argumentation in engineering) was therefore to identify and evaluate articles on teaching argumentation in K-12 classrooms. Specifically, the purpose of this literature review was to answer the following three research questions in regards to existing studies on engineering argumentation: What types of arguments are K-12 students asked to make in relation to the designed world? What instructional supports do teachers provide to students as they make these arguments? What are current strengths, as well as potential areas for improvement, in how engineering-related arguments and instructional scaffolds are operationalized and researched in K-12 classroom settings?

To answer these questions, a university librarian developed search terms in key databases related to education research, science research, and engineering research, resulting in 3,397 initial results. Multiple members of the research team eliminated articles that were duplicates, and they excluded articles that were beyond the scope of the review, based on clearly defined inclusion criteria such as the following: (a) The study is empirical in the sense that it states a research question, purpose, or hypothesis; includes a methods section with explicit mention of methods of data sources and analysis; and includes results or findings that stem from the analysis; and (b) Student participants in the study generate or use evidence-based claims in relation to the designed world. Supervised by a registered professional engineer, two members of the research team (with expertise in engineering and argumentation, respectively) are in the process of independently coding the studies using mutually-agreed upon codes.

We assert that engineering argumentation instruction in K-12 settings should teach students to consider multiple factors, including their knowledge of science and mathematics, results from tests, weighing trade-offs in terms of different yet valuable outcomes, and ethical considerations. We conclude by offering implications for more holistic, integrated instruction in engineering argumentation in K-12 settings.

Wilson-Lopez, A., & Sias, C. M., & Strong, A. R., & Garlick, J. W., & Minichiello, A., & Acosta Feliz, J. A., & Weingart, S. (2018, June), Argumentation in K-12 Engineering Education: A Review of the Literature (Fundamental) Paper presented at 2018 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Salt Lake City, Utah. https://peer.asee.org/29816

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2018 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015