Asee peer logo

Building Your Change-agent Toolkit: The Power of Story

Download Paper |

Conference

2018 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Publication Date

June 23, 2018

Start Date

June 23, 2018

End Date

July 27, 2018

Conference Session

Imagining and Reimagining Engineering Education as a Dynamic System

Tagged Division

Liberal Education/Engineering & Society

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

17

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/30166

Download Count

106

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Jennifer Karlin Minnesota State University, Mankato

visit author page

Jennifer Karlin spent the first half of her career at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, where she was a professor of industrial engineering and held the Pietz professorship for entrepreneurship and economic development. She is now a research professor of integrated engineering at Minnesota State University, Mankato, and the managing partner of Kaizen Academic.

visit author page

biography

Rebecca A. Bates Minnesota State University, Mankato

visit author page

Rebecca A. Bates received the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Washington. She also received the M.T.S. degree from Harvard Divinity School. She is currently Professor in the Department of Integrated Engineering program at Minnesota State University, Mankato, home of the Iron Range and Twin Cities Engineering programs.

visit author page

biography

Cheryl Allendoerfer University of Washington

visit author page

Dr. Allendoerfer is the Manager of Tutoring Services at Shoreline Community College.

visit author page

biography

Dan Ewert Anderson Industries

visit author page

Dr. Ewert has been involved in cardiovascular engineering for over 25 years in both research and instruction. He has consulted for major medical device companies in the area of cardiovascular engineering and performed research with US and international colleagues. He has a broad background in mechanical and electrical engineering, and physiology with specific training and expertise. His work includes modeling the cardiovascular system, ventricular assist devices, cardiac physiology, instrumentation systems and leadless cardiac pacing. He help developed and was the inaugural director of a project-based-learning engineering curriculum. As Chief Innovation and Culture Officer in industry, He is now involved in discovery-based-learning on multi-disciplinary teams.

visit author page

biography

Ronald R. Ulseth Itasca Community College

visit author page

Ron Ulseth directs and instructs in the Iron Range Engineering program in Virginia, Minnesota and he teaches in the Itasca Community College engineering program in Grand Rapids, MN. He was instrumental in growing the Itasca program from 10 students in 1992 to 160 students in 2010. In 2009, he worked with a national development team of engineering educators to develop the 100% PBL curriculum used in the Iron Range model. He has successfully acquired and managed over $10 million in educational grants including as PI on 7 grants from NSF. He has been in the classroom, teaching more than 20 credits per year to engineering students for more than 25 years. His specific areas of expertise are in active learning, faculty development, and learning community development. He has been awarded the 2012 Progress Minnesota award, 2012 Labovitz Entrepreneurialism award, and 2012 Innovator of the Year award from the Rural Community College Alliance all for his work in developing the Iron Range Engineering program. His degrees are in civil engineering (B.S., University of North Dakota), mechanical engineering (M.S., University of Central Florida), and engineering education (PhD, Aalborg University). He is licensed as a professional engineer in the state of Minnesota.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

“Once upon a time…”

“Long ago, in a land far, far away…”

Stories have been an important part of how humans remember their past and hope for a bright future long before we created written language. Telling our lived stories and listening to others’ stories are part of how we make sense of our lives and build our communities. It is no wonder that stories hold us in such thrall and have power in our relationships and organizations. Both listening to and telling stories are important skills for engineering educators and change agents at any career stage. Listening to the stories others tell provides an important glimpse into the values, beliefs, and assumptions made by those in the organization, and help us make sense of how our own stories fit into a given community. For example, a faculty member new to a department or a dean new to a college may be seeking allies to support an innovative curricular change; careful parsing of the stories told by others in the department or college may indicate who will be supportive and who is likely to only give lip service. Over time, changing the stories told, as well as telling new stories, shifts the assumptions of a group and how concepts turn into meaning.

Karlin, J., & Bates, R. A., & Allendoerfer, C., & Ewert, D., & Ulseth, R. R. (2018, June), Building Your Change-agent Toolkit: The Power of Story Paper presented at 2018 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Salt Lake City, Utah. https://peer.asee.org/30166

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2018 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015