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Computational Thinking in the Formation of Engineers (Year 1)

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Conference

2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual Conference

Publication Date

July 26, 2021

Start Date

July 26, 2021

End Date

July 19, 2022

Conference Session

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Tagged Topic

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

7

DOI

10.18260/1-2--36826

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/36826

Download Count

83

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Paper Authors

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Noemi V. Mendoza Diaz Texas A&M University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-1215-1554

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Dr. Mendoza Diaz is Assistant Professor at the College of Education and Human Development with a courtesy appointment in the College of Engineering at Texas A&M University. She obtained her Ph.D. from Texas A&M University in Educational Administration and Human Resource Development and worked as a Postdoctoral Researcher with the Institute for P-12 Engineering Research and Learning-INSPIRE at the School of Engineering Education-Purdue University. She was a recipient of the Apprentice Faculty Grant from the Educational Research Methods ASEE Division in 2009. She also has been an Electrical Engineering Professor for two Mexican universities. Dr. Mendoza is interested in sTEm education, socioeconomically disadvantaged students, Latino studies in engineering and computer aided/instructional technology in sTEm.

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Russ Meier Milwaukee School of Engineering Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-9380-9049

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Dr. Russ Meier is a Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the Milwaukee School of Engineering. He received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Computer Engineering from Iowa State University. His teaching and research interests include embedded systems, evolvable hardware, the use of complex adaptive systems in digital architectures, and computer architecture. He has a 25 year history of teaching excellence at the undergraduate and graduate levels. His teaching skills have been recognized with an Iowa State University Teaching Excellence Award, the Iowa State University Warren B. Boast Award for Undergraduate Teaching Excellence, and the MSOE Oscar Werwath Distinguished Teacher Award.

Dr. Meier maintains professional memberships in the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE), the ASEE Electrical and Computer Engineering Division (ECE), the ASEE Educational Research and Methods division (ERM),the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the IEEE Computer Society, and the IEEE Education Society.

Dr. Meier serves the engineering education community in a number of ways through leadership roles in his professional societies as well as work within ABET accreditation activities. He has held multiple officer positions within ASEE and IEEE and has worked with worldwide teams to release products and services to enhance the professional life of engineering and computer science educators. In 2012, the International Society for Engineering Education awarded Dr. Meier the title International Engineering Educator Honoris Causa for outstanding contributions in the field of Engineering Education and for dedicated work as an engineering educator. In 2018, the IEEE bestowed the Fellow grade upon Meier for outstanding contributions to global online engineering education.

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Deborah A. Trytten University of Oklahoma

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Dr. Deborah A. Trytten is an Associate Professor of Computer Science and Womens' and Gender Studies at the University of Oklahoma. Her main research focus is diversity in engineering education and introductory software engineering education.

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So Yoon Yoon University of Cincinnati Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-1868-1054

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So Yoon Yoon, Ph.D., is a research scientist at the Department of Engineering Education in the College of Engineering and Applied Science (CEAS) at the University of Cincinnati. She received her Ph.D. in Gifted Education, and an M.S.Ed. in Research Methods and Measurement with a specialization in Educational Psychology, both from Purdue University. Her work centers on engineering education research as a psychometrician, program evaluator, and data analyst, with research interests in spatial ability, creativity, engineering-integrated STEM education, and meta-analysis. As a psychometrician, she has revised, developed, and validated more than 10 instruments beneficial for STEM education practice and research. She has authored/co-authored more than 50 peer-reviewed journal articles and conference proceedings and served as a journal reviewer in engineering education, STEM education, and educational psychology. She has also served as a co-PI, an external evaluator, or an advisory board member on several NSF-funded projects.

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Janie M. Moore Texas A&M University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-3138-9632

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Dr. Janie McClurkin Moore is an Assistant Professor in the Biological and Agricultural Engineering Department at Texas A&M University in College Station. A native of Columbus, Ohio, she attended North Carolina A&T State University where she received a B.S. in Bio Environmental Engineering in 2006. She then began pursuing her graduate education at Purdue University in the Agricultural and Biological Engineering Department, completing her Ph.D. in 2015. Her primary research areas include 1) mycotoxin risk assessment and treatment in stored grains and 2) innovate instructional strategies for Biological and Agricultural Engineering students.

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Andrea M. Ogilvie P.E. Texas A&M University

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Andrea M. Ogilvie, Ph.D., P.E. serves as Assistant Dean for Student Success and Assistant Professor of Instruction in the College of Engineering at Texas A&M University. She is an engineering education researcher and practitioner who draws on decades of experience in engineering and higher education. Since 2014, Dr. Ogilvie’s research has focused on engineering transfer students and their experiences at both sending and receiving institutions. More broadly, her research interests center on higher education policy issues, workforce development, and broadening participation in STEM. Dr. Ogilvie holds multiple degrees in engineering and public affairs from UT Austin (BS Civil Engineering, Master of Public Affairs) and Virginia Tech (MS Industrial and Systems Engineering, PhD Engineering Education).

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Mark Weichold Texas A&M University

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Dr. Mark H. Weichold, Regents Professor and Halliburton Engineering Global Programs Professor, is an electrical engineer and has worked for General Dynamics Ft. Worth Division, Motorola in Austin, TX and the U.S. Army Electronic Technology and Devices Laboratory in Ft. Monmouth, NJ. He joined the Electrical Engineering faculty at Texas A&M University in 1982 and now holds the rank of Professor.

In January 2007, he became Dean and CEO of Texas A&M University’s branch campus in Doha, Qatar.
After completing nine years as the Dean and CEO of Texas A&M at Qatar, he returned to College Station to assume the role of Senior Associate Dean in the College of Engineering.

He is a Life Fellow of the IEEE, a member of the American Physical Society, an ABET program evaluator, and a licensed professional engineer in the State of Texas. In 2013, he was awarded the Abdullah bin Hamad Al Attiyah International Energy Award for ‘Lifetime Achievement for the Advancement of Education’.

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Abstract

Computational thinking is an important skill in the formation of engineers. Many schools of engineering include a programming course during the first-year. In 2019, NSF funded the “Collaborative Research: Research in Improving Computational Thinking in the Formation of Engineers, a Multi-Institutional Initiative.” The project’s goal is to improve the way computational thinking is taught at the college engineering level via the understanding of the multiple factors that affect computational thinking development. The project’s research questions are: · Research Question 1: How does the integration of computing into the foundational engineering courses affect the formation of engineers? · Research Question 2: In what ways do social identities (e.g. gender, ethnicity, first generation college attending, socioeconomic status), choices (e.g. major, transfer status), and other factors impact the engineering student experience with computational thinking? · Research Question 3: In what ways do computational thinking skills develop over time in engineering students? In order to respond to these questions, the research team developed a Computational Thinking Hybrid Framework, an Engineering Computational Thinking Diagnostic (ECTD) and a Position of Stress Questionnaire. Amid COVID-19, the advances of the project include approximately 2000 participants responding to the diagnostic during the Fall of 2019 and the Fall of 2020. With this participation, two cycles of validation have taken place for the ECTD and results are presented in this poster session. The factors validated in this diagnostic are (1) Abstraction, (2) Algorithmic Thinking and Programming, (3) Data Representation, Organization, and Analysis, (4) Decomposition, and (5) Impact of Computing. The positions of stress have been collected for the Fall of 2020 and preliminary results are also presented in this session.

Mendoza Diaz, N. V., & Meier, R., & Trytten, D. A., & Yoon, S. Y., & Moore, J. M., & Ogilvie, A. M., & Weichold, M. (2021, July), Computational Thinking in the Formation of Engineers (Year 1) Paper presented at 2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual Conference. 10.18260/1-2--36826

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