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Connections Between Undergraduate Engineering Students’ Problem-solving Strategies and Perceptions of Engineering Problems

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Conference

2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 14, 2015

Start Date

June 14, 2015

End Date

June 17, 2015

ISBN

978-0-692-50180-1

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Student Approaches to Problem Solving: ERM Roundtable

Tagged Division

Educational Research and Methods

Page Count

12

Page Numbers

26.396.1 - 26.396.12

DOI

10.18260/p.23735

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/23735

Download Count

166

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Paper Authors

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Catherine D. McGough Clemson University

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Catherine McGough is currently a graduate research assistant in Engineering and Science Education at Clemson University. She obtained her B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Clemson University in 2014. Her research interests are in undergraduate engineering student motivations and undergraduate engineering problem solving skill development and strategies.

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Adam Kirn Univeristy of Nevada, Reno

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Adam Kirn is an Assistant Professor of Engineering Education at University of Nevada, Reno. His research focuses on the interactions between engineering cultures, student motivation, and their learning experiences. His projects involve the study of student perceptions, beliefs and attitudes towards becoming engineers, their problem solving processes, and cultural fit. His education includes a B.S. in Biomedical Engineering from Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, a M.S. in Bioengineering and Ph.D. in Engineering and Science Education from Clemson University.

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Courtney June Faber Clemson University

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Courtney Faber is a graduate student in the Department of Engineering and Science Education at Clemson University and a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow. She holds a B.S. in Bioengineering from Clemson University and a M.S. in Biomedical Engineering from Cornell University.

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Lisa Benson Clemson University

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Lisa Benson is an Associate Professor of Engineering and Science Education at Clemson University, with a joint appointment in Bioengineering. Her research focuses on the interactions between student motivation and their learning experiences. Her projects involve the study of student perceptions, beliefs and attitudes towards becoming engineers and scientists, and their problem solving processes. Other projects in the Benson group include effects of student-centered active learning, self-regulated learning, and incorporating engineering into secondary science and mathematics classrooms. Her education includes a B.S. in Bioengineering from the University of Vermont, and M.S. and Ph.D. in Bioengineering from Clemson University.

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Abstract

Connections between Undergraduate Engineering Students’ Problem Solving Strategies and Perceptions of Engineering Problems Engineering educators must prepare future engineers for the demanding and dynamicproblems they will face in the field. Effective problem solving skills allow students to handle thecognitive demand of complex problems requiring novel approaches. Prior research has revealedinteractions between students’ future time perspectives (FTP), or how they view long-term goals,and how they define engineering problems, indicating how student action may be driven by theirmotivations. This study assesses problem solving strategies of engineering students to exploreconnections between how students approach an open-ended engineering problem and theirbeliefs about engineering problems. Nine second and third year mechanical and bioengineering students completed semi-structured interviews about their motivation as it relates to future and present goals and activities,and their perceptions and beliefs about what constitutes an engineering problem. Aphenomenological study of the interview data was conducted to characterize students accordingto their FTP’s: well-defined ideal future careers, conflicting ideal and realistic future careers, andno defined future career. These categories also corresponded with students’ perceptions ofengineering problems, going from well-defined and purposeful problems to “anything”,respectively. Seven of these students later completed an open-ended engineering problem and anadditional semi-structured interview. Interviews began with general questions about the problem,then prompted students to walk the interviewers through their problem solution, using thestudents’ own work for stimulated recall. Clarifying questions were asked about their strategiesfor solving the problem and strategies they typically implement when solving engineeringproblems. Student solutions and interviews were recorded using a Livescribe pen. The problem solving interviews were analyzed for strategies using directed contentanalysis based in part on descriptions and categorizations of strategies from prior research inmathematics education. Students’ written work was played back from the pen recording and wasanalyzed using a coding scheme developed specifically for identifying problem solvingprocesses in engineering students’ real time work. One interesting result from this analysis was that students who demonstrated the highestlevel of problem solving strategies were divided into two categories: students who defineengineering problems based on a series of well-defined steps and students who describe anengineering problem as anything. At least one strategy, dimensional analysis, was identified thatmay differentiate engineering problem solving from problem solving in other domains such asmathematics or science.Students’ written data is being integrated with results from the interviews, providing evidencethat supports or contradicts students’ self-reported processes and strategies. This research willprovide valuable insights into to the study of effects on problem solving of student attributes likemotivation, and effects of pedagogical interventions related to problem solving instruction.Furthermore, in-depth studies of engineering students’ problem solving strategies is likely toreveal strategies unique to engineering that could be used to improve problem solving instructionin engineering classrooms.

McGough, C. D., & Kirn, A., & Faber, C. J., & Benson, L. (2015, June), Connections Between Undergraduate Engineering Students’ Problem-solving Strategies and Perceptions of Engineering Problems Paper presented at 2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Seattle, Washington. 10.18260/p.23735

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