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Emergence of Engineering as a Discipline in Modern China: Separation of Confucian Liberal Learning from Technique

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Conference

2014 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Indianapolis, Indiana

Publication Date

June 15, 2014

Start Date

June 15, 2014

End Date

June 18, 2014

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Engineering & Our Global Society

Tagged Division

Liberal Education/Engineering & Society

Page Count

11

Page Numbers

24.474.1 - 24.474.11

DOI

10.18260/1-2--20365

Permanent URL

https://216.185.13.174/20365

Download Count

182

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Paper Authors

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wenjuan wang Beihang University

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Wenjuan Wang, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Beihang University ,beijing, PRC
Wenjuan Wang is a Ph.D. candidate in School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Beihang University Beijing, PRC. She received her M.Ed. in 2011 from Northwest Normal University. Her M.Ed. thesis involved the imperial examination policy of the minority nationalities of Yuan dynasty. Her primary specialty centers with the history of engineering education.

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Ming Li Beihang University

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Ming LI is a Ph.D. candidate in College of Humanities and Social Sciences, Beihang University, Beijing, PRC. He received B.A. in Qingdao Agricultural University and M.Ed. in Shandong Normal University, China. From March 2013 to June 2013, he studied in School of Engineering Education at Purdue University as a visiting scholar. He is interested in higher education administration as well as engineering education. Now his research interest focuses on the quality assurance in higher education, particularly quality assurance in engineering education.

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Brent K Jesiek Purdue University, West Lafayette

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Dr. Brent K. Jesiek is Assistant Professor in the Schools of Engineering Education and Electrical and Computer Engineering at Purdue University. He is also an Associate Director of Purdue's Global Engineering Program, leads the Global Engineering Education Collaboratory (GEEC) research group, and is the recent recipient of an NSF CAREER award to study boundary-spanning roles and competencies among early career engineers. He holds a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Michigan Tech and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Science and Technology Studies (STS) from Virginia Tech. Dr. Jesiek draws on expertise from engineering, computing, and the social sciences to advance understanding of geographic, disciplinary, and historical variations in engineering education and professional practice.

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Qin Zhu Purdue University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-6673-1901

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Qin Zhu is a PhD student in the School of Engineering Education at Purdue University. His main research interests include global/comparative/international engineering education, engineering education policy, and engineering ethics. He received his BS degree in material sciences and engineering and first PhD degree in philosophy of science and technology (engineering ethics) both from Dalian University of Technology, China. His first PhD dissertation on improving the practical effectiveness of engineering ethics that draws on theories in hermeneutics, practical philosophy, and discourse ethics has recently been awarded the "Outstanding Dissertation Award" in Liaoning Province, China.

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Jian Yuan Beihang University

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Jian YUAN is a Ph.D. Candidate at Beihang University, Beijing, China. He received his M.S. in Education from Northeast Normal University in 2011. Jian’s academic and research interests include engineering education, global engineering competency, engineering leadership, and service learning. From August 2013 to August 2014 he is a visiting graduate student scholar in Purdue's School of Engineering Education, working closely with Prof. Brent Jesiek and his GEEC research group.

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Qing Lei Beihang University

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Qing Lei is a professor and the Director of Institute of Higher Education, the Associate Dean of School of Humanities and Social Sciences at Beihang University (BUAA), Beijing, China. He has conducted research as a senior visiting scholar in the School of Education at Indiana University, US, in 2002. From 1990 to 1995, he was the Associate Director of the Dean’s Office, BUAA. He received his Ph.D. in 2003, M.Ed. in 1990, and B.Eng. in 1986 from BUAA. His primary social affiliations include the General Secretary of Chinese Society for Engineering Education, the Director of Chinese Academy of Engineering-BUAA Research Center for Engineering Education, and the consulter as a specialist of Beijing Municipal Government. He also served as the member of the executive committee for International Federation of Engineering Education Societies (IFEES) from 2006 to 2008.

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Abstract

On the Evolution of Chinese Engineering Education based on Historical Institutionalism, 1902-1922During the history of Chinese education, the evolution of engineering becoming an importantfield of higher education that is closely linked to the larger renewal of China’s educationalsystem. The Kui-Mao educational system, promulgated in 1902 as the first Western educationalsystem in modern China, included engineering education as part of a new national framework.To better understand the development of Chinese engineering education after this key event,some principles and methodologies of “historical institutionalism” are applied as an analytic lens,with a focus on engineering’s status as an independent discipline under the new policies.The evolution of engineering education in China during the formative period 1902-1922 is morespecifically divided into three historical stages. From 1902 to 1911, engineering educationinvolved establishing engineering as independent from other fields and bodies of knowledge.The period 1912 to 1916 witnessed the separation of knowledge rather than integration, and thebreaking of relations between engineering and humanities, including cancellation of theConfucian classics. From 1917 to 1922, some independent engineering universities and collegeswere born, as the educational system reform recognized the legitimacy of the universityorganized around a single field. For each stage, the influences of economic base, social cultureand the dialogue among civilizations of engineering education are analyzed based on thehistorical context, which shifted China from traditional society to modern society. The account isbased mainly on analysis of primary sources (e.g., original policy documents), and includesspecific examples of how the new educational system was implemented at certain schools.As we discuss, this historical period has lasting importance for the development of engineeringeducation in China. Of particular note is a fundamental and rapid shift from a more holistic andintegrated understanding of engineering and engineering education to a highly segmented andcompartmentalized approach adapted from the West. This paper provides an analysis frameworkand important historical case for historians of engineering education, engineering educators whowant to learn more about the development of Chinese engineering education, and engineeringeducation researchers who are interested in international comparisons of engineering education.Keywords: China, engineering education, historical institutionalism, history, policy,Westernization

wang, W., & Li, M., & Jesiek, B. K., & Zhu, Q., & Yuan, J., & Lei, Q. (2014, June), Emergence of Engineering as a Discipline in Modern China: Separation of Confucian Liberal Learning from Technique Paper presented at 2014 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Indianapolis, Indiana. 10.18260/1-2--20365

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2014 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015