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Engineering Undergraduates’ Task Interpretation during Problem-Solving in Thermodynamics

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Conference

2018 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Publication Date

June 23, 2018

Start Date

June 23, 2018

End Date

July 27, 2018

Conference Session

Problem Solving, Adaptive Expertise, and Social Engagement

Tagged Division

Educational Research and Methods

Page Count

10

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/30419

Download Count

17

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Paper Authors

biography

Oenardi Lawanto Utah State University

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Dr. Oenardi Lawanto is an associate professor in the Department of Engineering Education at Utah State University, USA. He received his B.S.E.E. from Iowa State University, his M.S.E.E. from the University of Dayton, and his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Before coming to Utah State, Dr. Lawanto taught and held several administrative positions at one large private university in Indonesia. He has developed and delivered numerous international workshops on student-centered learning and online learning-related topics during his service. Dr. Lawanto’s research interests include cognition, learning, and instruction, and online learning.

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Angela Minichiello P.E. Utah State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-4545-9355

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Angela Minichiello is an assistant professor in the Department of Engineering Education at Utah State University (USU) and a registered professional mechanical engineer. Her research examines issues of access, diversity, and inclusivity in engineering education. In particular, she is interested in professional formation, engineering problem-solving, and the intersections of online learning and alternative pathways for adult, nontraditional, and veteran undergraduates in engineering.

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Jacek Uziak University of Botswana

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Jacek Uziak is a Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering of the University of Botswana. He received his MSc in Mechanical Engineering from the AGH University of Technology in Krakow, Poland and his PhD in Technical Sciences from the University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland. For the past 35 years he has been working at universities mainly in Poland and Botswana; his career includes teaching and research assignments also in Canada, Czech Republic, Norway, UK, Netherlands, France, Germany and USA. He specializes in engineering mechanics and teaches courses in this area. He has particular interest in engineering education.

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Andreas Febrian Utah State University

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He received his bachelor and master degree in computer science (CS) from Universitas Indonesia, one of the top university in Indonesia. He was an active student who involved in various activities, such as research, teaching assistantship, and student organizations in the campus. He developed various CS skills through courses and research activities, especially in computer architecture, robotics, and web development. Through being a teaching assistant and joining student organizations, he developed an interest in psychology and Affective Computing. Currently, pursuing the Doctoral degree in Engineering Education at Utah State University with focuses in self-regulated learning in engineering design.

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Abstract

The accurate understanding of tasks, known in the Self-Regulated Learning literature as task interpretation, is an essential first step in any problem-solving activity. Task interpretation determines the approach taken toward problem-solving; inaccurate interpretation of problem- solving tasks will consequently result in a failed problem-solving attempt. Task interpretation is theorized to be a complex process that involves identifying explicit, implicit, and social- contextual aspects of identified problems. The purpose of this study is to better understand engineering students’ task interpretation processes while engaged in problem solving in an introductory engineering thermodynamics course. Two research questions guided the study: (1) What are the gaps, if any, between the instructor’s and students’ interpretation (explicit and implicit task features) of a problem-solving task?; and (2) How do students’ task interpretation (explicit and implicit) change after engaging in self-evaluation of their problem-solving processes? One hundred twelve (112) second year engineering undergraduates voluntarily participated in the study. The preliminary analysis revealed that students faced challenges interpreting tasks related to theassigned thermodynamics problems, even after engaging in self- evaluation of their problem solutions. It was also found that students experienced greater difficulty identifying the implicit task information than the explicit task information that was presented to them in the problem-solving assignments.

Lawanto, O., & Minichiello, A., & Uziak, J., & Febrian, A. (2018, June), Engineering Undergraduates’ Task Interpretation during Problem-Solving in Thermodynamics Paper presented at 2018 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Salt Lake City, Utah. https://peer.asee.org/30419

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