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How We Teach: Chemical Engineering in the First Year

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Conference

2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual On line

Publication Date

June 22, 2020

Start Date

June 22, 2020

End Date

June 26, 2021

Conference Session

Chemical Engineering in K-12 and the First Year

Tagged Division

Chemical Engineering

Page Count

33

DOI

10.18260/1-2--34738

Permanent URL

https://strategy.asee.org/34738

Download Count

90

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Paper Authors

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Laura P Ford The University of Tulsa

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LAURA P. FORD is an Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering at the University of Tulsa. She teaches engineering science thermodynamics, mass transfer, and chemical engineering senior labs. She is the advisor for TU’s chapter of Engineers Without Borders USA. Her email address is laura-ford@utulsa.edu.

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Janie Brennan Washington University in St. Louis

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Janie Brennan is a Lecturer of Energy, Environmental & Chemical Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis. She earned her Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from Purdue University in 2015. Her primary focus is on the application of research-based teaching methods in engineering education.

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Jennifer Cole Northwestern University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-7104-2986

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Jennifer Cole is the Assistant Chair in Chemical and Biological Engineering in the Robert R. McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science at Northwestern University and the Associate Director of the Northwestern Center for Engineering Education Research. Dr. Cole’s primary teaching is in capstone and freshman design, and her research interest are in engineering design education.

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Kevin D. Dahm Rowan University

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Kevin Dahm is a Professor of Chemical Engineering at Rowan University. He earned his BS from Worcester Polytechnic Institute (92) and his PhD from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (98). He has published two books, "Fundamentals of Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics" and "Interpreting Diffuse Reflectance and Transmittance." He has also published papers on effective use of simulation in engineering, teaching design and engineering economics, and assessment of student learning.

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Marnie V Jamieson University of Alberta

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Marnie V. Jamieson, M. Sc., P.Eng. is an Industrial Professor in Chemical Process Design
in the Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering at the University of Alberta and holds an M.Sc. in Chemical Engineering Education. She is currently the William Magee Chair in Chemical Process Design, leads the process design teaching team, manages the courses and industry interface. Her current research focuses on the application of blended and active learning to design teaching and learning, program content and structure, student assessment, and continuous course improvement techniques. She managed and was a key contributor to a two-year pilot project to introduce Blended Learning into Engineering Capstone Design Courses, and is a co-author with John M. Shaw on a number of recent journal, book, and conference contributions on engineering design education. Recently she has taught a short course on how to design and teach process engineering courses to professors in Peru and workshops on Metacognition and Lifelong Learning in engineering programs.

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Lucas James Landherr Northeastern University

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Dr. Lucas Landherr is an associate teaching professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering at Northeastern University, conducting research in comics and engineering education.

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David L. Silverstein P.E. University of Kentucky

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David L. Silverstein is a Professor of Chemical Engineering at the University of Kentucky. He is also the Director of the College of Engineering's Extended Campus Programs in Paducah, Kentucky, where he has taught since 1999. His PhD and MS studies in ChE were completed at Vanderbilt University, and his BSChE at the University of Alabama. Silverstein's research interests include conceptual learning tools and training, and he has particular interests in faculty development. He is the recipient of several ASEE awards, including the Fahein award for young faculty teaching and educational scholarship, the Corcoran award for best article in the journal Chemical Engineering Education (twice), and the Martin award for best paper in the ChE Division at the ASEE Annual Meeting.

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Bruce K Vaughen P.E. American Institute of Chemical Engineers Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-6424-5136

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Bruce K. Vaughen, Ph.D., P.E., CCPSC, (brucv@aiche.org) is the Lead Process Safety Subject Matter Expert at the Center for Chemical Process Safety (CCPS), a Technology Alliance in the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE). He has more than two and a half decades of process safety experience, including engineering, research, teaching, and consulting experiences in DuPont, DuPont Teijin Films, Cabot Corporation, and BakerRisk, and as a visiting assistant professor at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, Terre Haute, Indiana. His roles have included leading global Process Safety Management (PSM) efforts, updating and developing corporate PSM standards, and developing PSM training and workshops. He is a co-author with James A. Klein for the book Process Safety: Key Concepts and Practical Approaches (CRCPress 2017), is the principal author of three CCPS guideline books [Process Safety During the Transient Operating Mode (Wiley 2020); Siting and Layout of Facilities (Wiley, 2018); and Integrating Management Systems and Metrics to Improve Process Safety Performance (Wiley, 2016)], and has developed training modules for AIChE’s Safety and Chemical Engineering Education (SAChE) committee. He holds a BS degree in chemical engineering from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, MS and PhD degrees in chemical engineering from Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, and is a registered professional engineer in the USA.

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Margot A Vigeant Bucknell University

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Margot Vigeant is a professor of chemical engineering at Bucknell University. She earned her B.S. in chemical engineering from Cornell University, and her M.S. and Ph.D., also in chemical engineering, from the University of Virginia. Her primary research focus is on engineering pedagogy at the undergraduate level. She is particularly interested in the teaching and learning of concepts related to thermodynamics. She is also interested in active, collaborative, and problem-based learning, and in the ways hands-on activities such as making, technology, and games can be used to improve student engagement.

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Stephen Ward Thiel P.E. University of Cincinnati Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-6797-7225

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Stephen Thiel is a Professor-Educator in the Chemical Engineering program at the University of Cincinnati (UC). He received his BS in Chemical Engineering from Virginia Tech, and his MS and PhD in Chemical Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin. His past research has focused on membrane science, adsorption, and ion exchange. He currently serves as the Chemical Engineering Undergraduate Program Director at UC and teaches the capstone process design sequence. He is a licensed Professional Engineer in the State of Ohio.

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Abstract

In Fall 2019, the AIChE Education Division Curriculum Survey Committee surveyed chemical engineering programs across the United States and Canada about chemical engineering in the first year. Eighty-two responses were received. At most of our schools, students consider themselves chemical engineering majors from the first semester, but they are not formally chemical engineering majors until usually by the start of the third semester. At about half of those schools, they must simply be in good standing to become a chemical engineering major, but at about half of the schools they must pass certain courses and meet a cutoff GPA. We do not require that they own computers, but most of them do anyway. We have found that a majority of schools require an introduction to engineering and many have a required introduction to discipline course. The introduction to engineering course usually does not have chemical engineering content. The courses cover similar topics, but introduction to discipline courses cover more safety and introduction to engineering covers more engineering design. Both types of courses use similar assessments and software, with engineering courses using MATLAB more. Introduction to engineering courses and sections are larger than introduction to discipline courses. A wide variety of classroom activities are used in both types of introduction courses.

Ford, L. P., & Brennan, J., & Cole, J., & Dahm, K. D., & Jamieson, M. V., & Landherr, L. J., & Silverstein, D. L., & Vaughen, B. K., & Vigeant, M. A., & Thiel, S. W. (2020, June), How We Teach: Chemical Engineering in the First Year Paper presented at 2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual On line . 10.18260/1-2--34738

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