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Institutional Mentoring to Incite a Revolution through NSF’s RED Program

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Conference

2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Columbus, Ohio

Publication Date

June 24, 2017

Start Date

June 24, 2017

End Date

June 28, 2017

Conference Session

Action on Diversity - Institutional Change & Perspectives on Diversity

Tagged Topics

Diversity and ASEE Diversity Committee

Page Count

12

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/28538

Download Count

47

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Paper Authors

biography

Susan M Lord University of San Diego

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Susan M. Lord received a B.S. from Cornell University and the M.S. and Ph.D. from Stanford University. She is currently Professor and Chair of Electrical Engineering at the University of San Diego. Her teaching and research interests include electronics, optoelectronics, materials science, first year engineering courses, feminist and liberative pedagogies, engineering student persistence, and student autonomy. Her research has been sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF). Dr. Lord is a fellow of the ASEE and IEEE and is active in the engineering education community including serving as General Co-Chair of the 2006 Frontiers in Education (FIE) Conference, on the FIE Steering Committee, and as President of the IEEE Education Society for 2009-2010. She is an Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Education. She and her coauthors were awarded the 2011 Wickenden Award for the best paper in the Journal of Engineering Education and the 2011 Best Paper Award for the IEEE Transactions on Education. In Spring 2012, Dr. Lord spent a sabbatical at Southeast University in Nanjing, China teaching and doing research.

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Michelle M. Camacho University of San Diego

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Michelle Madsen Camacho is Professor in the Department of Sociology and Special Assistant to the Provost at the University of San Diego. She is a former fellow of the American Council on Education at UC San Diego. Fluent in both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies, her research uses theories from interdisciplinary sources including cultural studies, critical race, gender and feminist theories. Central to her work are questions of culture, power and inequality. She is co-author, with Susan Lord, of The Borderlands of Education: Latinas in Engineering.

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Nadia N. Kellam Arizona State University

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Dr. Nadia Kellam is Associate Professor in the Polytechnic Engineering Program at Arizona State University. Prior to this position, she was an Associate Professor at the University of Georgia, where she was co-director of the interdisciplinary engineering education research Collaborative Lounge for Understanding Society and Technology through Educational Research (CLUSTER). In her research, she is interested in understanding how engineering students develop their professional identity, the role of emotion in student learning, and synergistic learning. A recent research project uncovers the narratives of exemplary engineering faculty who have successfully transitioned to student-centered teaching strategies. She co-designed the environmental engineering synthesis and design studios and the design spine for the mechanical engineering program at UGA. She is engaged in mentoring early career faculty at her university and within the PEER National Collaborative. In 2013 she was selected to be a National Academy of Engineering Frontiers of Engineering Education Faculty Member.

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Julia M. Williams Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

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Dr. Julia M. Williams is Interim Dean of Cross-Cutting Programs and Emerging Opportunities and Professor of English, at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. Her research areas include technical communication, assessment, accreditation, and the development of change management strategies for faculty and staff. Her articles have appeared in the Journal of Engineering Education, International Journal of Engineering Education, IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication, and Technical Communication Quarterly, among others.

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Abstract

A recent initiative from the National Science Foundation (NSF), IUSE/PFE: REvolutionizing engineering and computer science Departments (RED), is serving as a catalyst to encourage widespread, revolutionary, and radical change in engineering and computer science departments across the nation. After two years and 13 RED awards being funded, there is little diversity in the types of institutions—one is private, two are undergraduate-focused, and twho are Hispanic-serving institutions. To address this lack of institutional diversity in funded RED projects, previous awardees of the program utilized a framework developed by the team, termed institutional mentoring, to develop a series of webinars aimed at helping diverse institutions envision a revolutionary idea for radically changing their program, assembling a team capable of realizing this vision, and using change strategies to help increase the likelihood of success and lasting change. This team deliberately reached out to Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and minority-serving institutions in an attempt to make more diverse institutions aware of this opportunity, with the hopes of increasing submissions of proposals to the RED program and the quality and likelihood of success for these proposals. In this paper, we describe the institutional mentoring framework, the process used in developing the seminars, and a synopsis of the sessions that made up the webinar.

Lord, S. M., & Camacho, M. M., & Kellam, N. N., & Williams, J. M. (2017, June), Institutional Mentoring to Incite a Revolution through NSF’s RED Program Paper presented at 2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Columbus, Ohio. https://peer.asee.org/28538

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