Asee peer logo

Mapping Trajectories of Researcher Development with Qualitative Longitudinal Analysis: An Executive Summary

Download Paper |

Conference

2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual Conference

Publication Date

July 26, 2021

Start Date

July 26, 2021

End Date

July 19, 2022

Conference Session

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Tagged Topic

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

7

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/37481

Download Count

12

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Renee Rigrish Pelan Ohio State University

visit author page

Renee Rigrish Pelan is an Engineering Education graduate student at The Ohio State University. She is working on the AISL grant as a Graduate Research Associate under Dr. Rachel Louis Kajfez. She holds an M.S. degree in Industrial & Human Factors Engineering and a B.S. in Industrial & Systems Engineering from Wright State University. Her research interests include diversity in engineering, teaching methods, and informal learning environments.

visit author page

biography

Renee Desing Ohio State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-4052-2423

visit author page

Renee Desing is a postdoctoral scholar at the Ohio State University in the Department of Engineering Education. Dr. Desing recently graduated from Ohio State with her Ph.D. in Engineering Education. Her research interests include motivation and identity in engineering and diversity and inclusion in the workplace. Dr. Desing also holds a B.S. in Industrial Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology and a M.S. in Industrial Engineering and Operations Research from the Pennsylvania State University.

visit author page

biography

Rachel Louis Kajfez Ohio State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-9745-1921

visit author page

Dr. Rachel Louis Kajfez is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Engineering Education at The Ohio State University. She earned her B.S. and M.S. degrees in Civil Engineering from Ohio State and earned her Ph.D. in Engineering Education from Virginia Tech. Her research interests focus on the intersection between motivation and identity of undergraduate and graduate students, first-year engineering programs, mixed methods research, and innovative approaches to teaching. She is the faculty lead for the Research on Identity and Motivation in Engineering (RIME) Collaborative.

visit author page

biography

Amber Dyche Ohio State University

visit author page

I am a third-year studying industrial systems engineering and a minor in organization and performance. Along with being an undergraduate research assistant in the department of engineering education, I am very involved in the Society of Women Engineers. During my college career, I have been an active member and held the position of Education Director.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

Being able to communicate scientific findings is an important skill for STEM researchers. While most researchers will typically communicate findings in professional settings to colleagues within their field, there are also opportunities to disseminate findings to the public. Engaging the community in research can spark interest and further engagement in the researcher’s topic. Our team is creating an experience to give researchers from divergent disciplines an opportunity to collaborate and present their research to the local community.

This experience brings together researchers from divergent disciplines into a cohort. The cohort collaborates around a convergent theme, such as energy, to improve and expand how they currently communicate their research to the public. First, we trained the participants on how to communicate research in informal public settings. Next, the participating researchers presented their research individually in two informal learning venues. Finally, the researchers from each cohort collaborated to create a convergent presentation that incorporated all of their research while centering it around the convergent theme. The participants were interviewed twice for each presentation in this set to discuss their goals for the various presentations, what they changed after the prior experience, and to reflect on their presentation experience.

This executive summary discusses the analysis completed to-date with a focus on the longitudinal coding performed as a secondary coding method. Our analysis is situated in the Longitudinal Model of Motivation and Identity (LMMI) as a theoretical framework. The LMMI centers how motivation to participate in interdisciplinary research and in different outlets to disseminate research, as well as identity as a researcher evolve over the experience. We started with an initial coding approach to see what themes emerged from the transcripts. This led to the development of a codebook to be used for future cohorts. Once all transcripts were coded, our team discussed that we wanted to examine the trajectory of each researcher over the experience. Longitudinal coding was chosen as a secondary coding method to assess changes in how participants talked about their communication experiences within the program and the different themes which emerged in the first round of coding. We also discuss how we developed the process to analyze each researcher’s trajectory through extracting meaningful quotes to showcase their growth over time.

Our work contributes to the general body of literature related to STEM communication by exploring how identity as a researcher and motivation to participate in interdisciplinary collaborations and communicate to the public grew over the course of the presentations. Because our work is situated in the LMMI, our approach allows us to track participant development throughout the course of the program with regards to their motivation and identity as researchers and how they will modify their research dissemination after the program.

Pelan, R. R., & Desing, R., & Kajfez, R. L., & Dyche, A. (2021, July), Mapping Trajectories of Researcher Development with Qualitative Longitudinal Analysis: An Executive Summary Paper presented at 2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual Conference. https://peer.asee.org/37481

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2021 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015