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Special Session: Discovering Implications of the Academic Pathways Study for YOUR Campus

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Conference

2011 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Vancouver, BC

Publication Date

June 26, 2011

Start Date

June 26, 2011

End Date

June 29, 2011

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Special Session: Discovering implications of the Academic Pathways Study for YOUR Campus

Tagged Division

Educational Research and Methods

Page Count

16

Page Numbers

22.1316.1 - 22.1316.16

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/18521

Download Count

27

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Paper Authors

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Cynthia J. Atman University of Washington

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Cynthia J. Atman is a Professor in Human-Centered Design & Engineering, founding Director of the Center for Engineering Learning & Teaching (CELT), Director of the Center for the Advancement of Engineering Education (CAEE) and the inaugural holder of the Mitchell T. & Lella Blanche Bowie Endowed Chair at the University of Washington. She earned her doctorate in engineering and public policy from Carnegie Mellon University and joined the UW in 1998 after seven years on the faculty at the University of Pittsburgh. Her research focuses on engineering design learning and students as emerging engineering professionals. She is a fellow of AAAS and ASEE, was the 2002 recipient of the ASEE Chester F. Carlson Award for Innovation in Engineering Education, and received the 2009 David B. Thorud Leadership Award, which is given to a UW faculty or staff for demonstrating leadership, innovation, and teamwork.

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Sheri Sheppard, P.E. Stanford University

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Samantha Brunhaver Stanford University

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Samantha Brunhaver is a third year graduate student at Stanford University. She is currently working on her Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering with a focus in engineering education. She completed a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Northeastern University in 2008 and a M.S. in Mechanical Engineering with a focus in Design for Manufacturing from Stanford University in 2010.

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Debbie Chachra Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering

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Helen L. Chen Stanford University

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Shannon Katherine Gilmartin Stanford University

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Deborah Kilgore University of Washington

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Deborah Kilgore is a Research Scientist in the Center for Engineering Learning & Teaching at the University of Washington. She has extensive expertise in the learning sciences and education research methods.

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Micah Lande Stanford University

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Micah Lande is a Ph.D. candidate studying Mechanical Engineering Design and Design Education at the Center for Design Research at Stanford University. He researches how engineers learn and apply a design process to their work. Micah's academic interests include design thinking, engineering thinking, prototyping, design learning and design cognition, engineering education and mechanical engineering design. He has helped teach human-centered design courses in the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design (aka the d.school) and mechanical engineering design classes in Stanford's Mechanical Engineering Design Group, including ME310 Global, a graduate course in design and innovation. Micah has been a researcher at the Center for the Advancement of Engineering Education, both as part of the Academic Pathways Study research team and an Institute Scholar with the Institute for the Scholarship of Engineering Education. Micah received his B.S in Engineering from the Stanford School of Engineering Product Design program and a M.A. in Education from the Stanford School of Education Learning, Design and Technology program. Micah has also been a co-Editor-in-Chief of AMBIDEXTROUS, Stanford University’s Journal of Design.

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Gary Lichtenstein Quality Evaluation Designs

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Dennis Lund University of Washington

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Karl A. Smith Purdue University, West Lafayette

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Karl Smith is Cooperative Learning Professor of Engineering Education, School of Engineering Education, at Purdue University, West Lafayette and is in phased retirement as Morse-Alumni Distinguished Teaching Professor and Professor of Civil Engineering at the University of Minnesota. His research and development interests include building rigorous research capabilities in engineering education; the role of cooperation in learning and design; problem formulation, modeling, and knowledge engineering; and project and knowledge management. He is a Fellow of the American Society for Engineering Education and past Chair of the Educational Research and Methods Division. He has served as PI and Co–PI on several NSF funded projects including two NSF Centers for Learning and Teaching (CLT). He was Co–PI on an NSF CCLI National Dissemination grant entitled "Rigorous Research in Engineering Education: Creating a Community of Practice" and is currently Co-PI on an NSF CCLI Phase III project, “Expanding and sustaining research capacity in engineering and technology education: Building on successful programs for faculty and graduate students.” He has authored or co-authored eight books including How to Model It: Problem Solving for the Computer Age, Active Learning: Cooperation in the College Classroom, 3rd Ed., Cooperative learning: Increasing college faculty instructional productivity; Strategies for energizing large classes: From small groups to learning communities; and Teamwork and project management, 3rd Ed. His Bachelor's and Master's degrees are in Metallurgical Engineering from Michigan Technological University and he holds a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology from the University of Minnesota.

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Jennifer A. Turns University of Washington

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Jennifer Turns is an Associate Professor in the Department of Human Centered Design and Engineering at the University of Washington. She is interested in all aspects of engineering education, including how to support engineering students in reflecting on experience, how to help engineering educators make effective teaching decisions, and the application of ideas from complexity science to the challenges of engineering education.

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Ken Yasuhara University of Washington

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Ken Yasuhara is a research scientist at the University of Washington's Center for Engineering Learning & Teaching. He was a member of the Academic Pathways Study team with the Center for the Advancement of Engineering Education.

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Abstract

Special Session: Discovering Implications of the Academic Pathways Study For YOUR CampusThe Academic Pathways Study (APS) was a large study of the engineering student experiencethat was part of the Center for the Advancement of Engineering Education (CAEE). The APSinvolved a broad collaboration of scholars who conducted innovative multi-year studiesinvolving over 5,400 students at more than 20 institutions. The scholarship generated asubstantial set of research findings that can be used to inform practice in engineering education.In this interactive special session, we invite engineering educators – faculty, administrators, andstudent affairs specialists – to consider the implications that APS findings have for theircampuses. The goal of the session is to offer participants a chance to forge connections betweenAPS research findings and sound educational practices on their campuses, given their uniqueengineering programs, college culture, and student body. Participants will consider “local inquiryquestions” that have been informed by the APS research in any of the following areas: 1. Welcoming Students into Engineering (questions about topics like recruiting, admissions process, new student support) 2. Understanding and Connecting with Today’s Learners (questions about topics like getting feedback from students, attending to diversity, identifying and encouraging students’ passions) 3. Helping Students Become Engineers (questions about topics like developing students’ professional identity, design learning, knowledge integration) 4. Developing the Whole Learner (questions about topics like helping students get the most from their WHOLE college experience, providing opportunities for significant learning) 5. Positioning Students for Professional Success (questions about topics like meeting workforce needs), and 6. Welcoming Students into the Work World (questions about topics like helping students transition into the workplace).The session will consist primarily of small group discussions and guided activities. Several APSresearchers will be on hand to answer audience questions about the study as needed. The sessionwill consist of the following parts: PART 1. Overview of key research results that form the foundation for local inquiry questions. APS researchers will present (40 minutes). PART 2. Considering priorities (30 minutes). In small group discussion and guided activities, participants will be asked to consider and prioritize local inquiry questions. Which areas are of key interest to you in your role as a (teacher/administrator/program planner/etc.)? Considering your perspective in particular, what questions would you most like to pursue the answers to?PART 3. Formulating answers (30 minutes). In small group discussion and guidedactivities, participants will reflect and exchange ideas about how to gauge their campus’effectiveness in any of the areas described above, and potential interventions to improvetheir engineering education.PART 4. Taking it to your campus. In the large group, we will report out and discuss nextsteps for translating APS research to practice on attendees’ unique campuses.

Atman, C. J., & P.E., S. S., & Brunhaver, S., & Chachra, D., & Chen, H. L., & Gilmartin, S. K., & Kilgore, D., & Lande, M., & Lichtenstein, G., & Lund, D., & Smith, K. A., & Turns, J. A., & Yasuhara, K. (2011, June), Special Session: Discovering Implications of the Academic Pathways Study for YOUR Campus Paper presented at 2011 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Vancouver, BC. https://peer.asee.org/18521

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