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The Engineering Exchange for Social Justice (ExSJ): Advancing Justice Through Sociotechnical Engineering and Equitable Partnership Exchanges

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Conference

2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual Conference

Publication Date

July 26, 2021

Start Date

July 26, 2021

End Date

July 19, 2022

Conference Session

Changing How We Pursue Change

Tagged Divisions

Equity and Culture & Social Justice in Education

Tagged Topic

Diversity

Page Count

13

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/37861

Download Count

22

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Paper Authors

biography

Marissa H. Forbes University of San Diego

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Marissa Forbes, PhD is a Research Associate in the University of San Diego Shiley-Marcos School of Engineering, where she works on the Engineering Exchange for Social Justice (ExSJ). Her research areas include broadening participation in engineering education, engineering for social and eco-justice, and water justice. Dr. Forbes earned her MS and PhD from the University of Colorado Boulder in Civil (environmental) Engineering. She previously served as the project manager and lead editor of the NSF-funded TeachEngineering digital library (TeachEngineering.org, a free library of K-12 engineering curriculum), during which she mentored NSF GK-12 Fellows and NSF Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) participants from across the country on the creation and publication of their original engineering curriculum. Dr. Forbes is a former high school physics and engineering teacher and a former NSF GK-12 Fellow.

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Odesma Onika Dalrymple University of San Diego

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Dr. Odesma Dalrymple is an Associate Professor and Faculty Lead for the Engineering Exchange for Social Justice, in the Shiley Marcos School of Engineering at University of San Diego. Her professional pursuits are focused on transforming engineering education and its public image; making it more inclusive and socially connected. This mission is partially actualized through her research, which that explores the wealth of embodied knowledge, skills and practices that under-represented/marginalized communities can bring to bear on engineering practice. These insights are in turn used to inform the development of asset-based engineering learning experiences for middle and high school populations that predominantly comprise students of color from low-socioeconomic neighborhoods, and the creation of guides on how engineers can collaboratively work with communities on grass roots socio-technical challenges.

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Susan M. Lord University of San Diego

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Susan M. Lord received a B.S. from Cornell University in Materials Science and Electrical Engineering (EE) and the M.S. and Ph.D. in EE from Stanford University. She is currently Professor and Chair of Integrated Engineering at the University of San Diego. Her research focuses on the study and promotion of diversity in engineering including student pathways and inclusive teaching. She is Co-Director of the National Effective Teaching Institute (NETI). Her research has been sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF). Dr. Lord is among the first to study Latinos in engineering and coauthored The Borderlands of Education: Latinas in Engineering. Dr. Lord is a Fellow of the IEEE and ASEE and is active in the engineering education community including serving as General Co-Chair of the Frontiers in Education Conference, President of the IEEE Education Society, and Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Education (ToE) and the Journal of Engineering Education (JEE). She and her coauthors received the 2011 Wickenden Award for the best paper in JEE and the 2011 and 2015 Best Paper Awards for the IEEE ToE. In Spring 2012, Dr. Lord spent a sabbatical at Southeast University in Nanjing, China teaching and doing research. She is on the USD team implementing “Developing Changemaking Engineers”, an NSF-sponsored Revolutionizing Engineering Education (RED) project. Dr. Lord is the 2018 recipient of the IEEE Undergraduate Teaching Award.

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Caroline Baillie University of San Diego

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Caroline Baillie is Professor of Praxis in Engineering and social justice

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Gordon D. Hoople University of San Diego Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-2663-4664

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Dr. Gordon D. Hoople is an assistant professor and one of the founding faculty members of integrated engineering at the University of San Diego. He is passionate about creating engaging experiences for his students. His work is primarily focused on two areas: engineering education and design. Professor Hoople’s engineering education research examines the ways in which novel approaches can lead to better student outcomes. He is the principal investigator on the National Science Foundation Grant “Reimagining Energy: Exploring Inclusive Practices for Teaching Energy Concepts to Undergraduate Engineering Majors.” He has also co-developed a unique interdisciplinary course, Drones for Good, where engineering students partner with peace studies students to design a quadcopter that will have a positive impact on society.

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Joel Alejandro Mejia University of San Diego Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-3908-9930

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Dr. Joel Alejandro (Alex) Mejia is an assistant professor in the Department of Integrated Engineering at the University of San Diego. His research has contributed to the integration of critical theoretical frameworks and Chicano Cultural Studies to investigate and analyze existing deficit models in engineering education. Dr. Mejia’s work also examines how asset-based models impact the validation and recognition of students and communities of color as holders and creators of knowledge. His current work seeks to analyze and describe the tensions, contradictions, and cultural collisions many Latino/a/x students experience in engineering through testimonios. He is particularly interested in approaches that contribute to a more expansive understanding of engineering in sociocultural contexts, the impact of critical consciousness in engineering practice, and development and implementation of culturally responsive pedagogies in engineering education.

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Abstract

The University of San Diego’s Engineering Exchange for Social Justice (ExSJ) is a framework for community partnership and co-created, justice-oriented solutions to socio-technical challenges. The core tenets of this framework are community-partnered engineering, and engineering education through equitable and reciprocal exchange (rather than service) and a socio-technical (rather than techno-centric) approach. In this paper, we share: 1) the ExSJ framework, 2) the infrastructure, mechanisms, and activities we are using to apply this framework, and 3) the challenges and complexities we are facing as we apply it. The foundational values of the ExSJ can be applied to all engineering contexts, providing a platform for change that moves away from narrowly constructed and techno-centric epistemological approaches, and an expansion to engage social and environmental justice, humanitarian goals, peace, and sustainability in engineering through equitable partnership exchanges.

Forbes, M. H., & Dalrymple, O. O., & Lord, S. M., & Baillie, C., & Hoople, G. D., & Mejia, J. A. (2021, July), The Engineering Exchange for Social Justice (ExSJ): Advancing Justice Through Sociotechnical Engineering and Equitable Partnership Exchanges Paper presented at 2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual Conference. https://peer.asee.org/37861

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