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Using Video Media to Enhance Conceptual Learning in an Undergraduate Thermodynamics Course

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Conference

2013 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Atlanta, Georgia

Publication Date

June 23, 2013

Start Date

June 23, 2013

End Date

June 26, 2013

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Grantees' Poster Session

Tagged Topic

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

5

Page Numbers

23.1346.1 - 23.1346.5

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/22731

Download Count

54

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Paper Authors

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James P Abulencia Manhattan College

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Margot A Vigeant Bucknell University

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Dr. Margot Vigeant is associate dean of engineering and associate professor of chemical engineering at Bucknell University. Her technical interests include engineering pedagogy, food science and engineering, and modeling flow and diffusion.

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David L. Silverstein University of Kentucky

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Dr. David L. Silverstein is the PJC engineering professor of Chemical Engineering at the University of Kentucky and director of the College of Engineering's Extended Campus Programs in Paducah, Kentucky where he has taught for 13 years. His Ph.D. and M.S. studies in Chemical Engineering were completed at Vanderbilt University, and his B.S. in Chemical Engineering at the University of Alabama. Dr. Silverstein's research interests include conceptual learning tools and training. He has particular interests in faculty development. He is the recipient of several ASEE awards, including the Fahein award for young faculty teaching and educational scholarship, the Corcoran award for best article in the journal Chemical Engineering Education (twice), and the Martin award for best paper in the Chemical Engineering Division at the ASEE Annual Meeting.

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Abstract

Using Video Media to Enhance Conceptual Learning in an Undergraduate Thermodynamics CourseAbstract This project addresses the need for changing undergraduate chemical engineeringeducation to take advantage of skills possessed by a media savvy generation of students. Morespecifically, millennials communicate through a broad range of technology from texting tomobile video conferencing. This project aims to leverage these skills, more specifically theiraffinity to watching online videos, to enhance conceptual learning in an introductorythermodynamics course. To this end, the collaborative team from [Authors institutions] will have students: 1)develop an instructional video that teaches a concept in thermodynamics using commonmetaphors, and 2) watch a similarly constructed instructional video developed by peers. Athermodynamics concept inventory administered pre and post-treatment will measure studentsconceptual learning. The first year implementation of this three year project tasked students togenerate a video that teaches a thermodynamic concept. This activity centers on autodidacticlearning, where students that are required to teach a topic must master it. The mean scores fromall of the institutions revealed that there was no significant difference between the group whogenerated these teaching videos, and control. This may be attributed to the fact that studentswere tasked to generate a video on only one topic, rather than several covering a broad range.The second year of implementation tasks students to watch videos from all of the topics, and isthe current focus of the collaboration.

Abulencia, J. P., & Vigeant, M. A., & Silverstein, D. L. (2013, June), Using Video Media to Enhance Conceptual Learning in an Undergraduate Thermodynamics Course Paper presented at 2013 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Atlanta, Georgia. https://peer.asee.org/22731

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