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Mapping Entrepreneurial Minded Learning with the Longitudinal Model of Motivation and Identity in First-Year Engineering

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Conference

2018 FYEE Conference

Location

Glassboro, New Jersey

Publication Date

July 24, 2018

Start Date

July 24, 2018

End Date

July 26, 2018

Conference Session

Technical Session III

Tagged Topic

FYEE Conference Sessions

Page Count

6

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/31424

Download Count

96

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Paper Authors

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Renee Desing Ohio State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-4052-2423

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Renee Desing is currently a graduate student at the Ohio State University in the Department of Engineering Education. Ms. Desing holds a B.S. in Industrial Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology and a M.S. in Industrial Engineering and Operations Research from the Pennsylvania State University. Most recently, Ms. Desing worked as a managing consultant for IBM Public Sector Advanced Analytics.

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Rachel Louis Kajfez Ohio State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-9745-1921

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Dr. Rachel Louis Kajfez is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Engineering Education at The Ohio State University. She earned her B.S. and M.S. degrees in Civil Engineering from Ohio State and earned her Ph.D. in Engineering Education from Virginia Tech. Her research interests focus on the intersection between motivation and identity of undergraduate and graduate students, first-year engineering programs, mixed methods research, and innovative approaches to teaching.

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Krista M Kecskemety Ohio State University

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Krista Kecskemety is an Assistant Professor of Practice in the Department of Engineering Education at The Ohio State University. Krista received her B.S. in Aerospace Engineering at The Ohio State University in 2006 and received her M.S. from Ohio State in 2007. In 2012, Krista completed her Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering at Ohio State. Her engineering education research interests include investigating first-year engineering student experiences, faculty experiences, and the connection between the two.

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Deborah M. Grzybowski Ohio State University

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Dr. Deborah Grzybowski is a Professor of Practice in the Department of Engineering Education and the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at The Ohio State University. She received her Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering and her B.S. and M.S. in Chemical Engineering from The Ohio State University. Her research focuses on making engineering accessible to all students, including students with visual impairments, through the use of art-infused curriculum and models. Prior to becoming focused on student success and retention, her research interests included regulation of intracranial pressure and transport across the blood-brain barrier in addition to various ocular-cellular responses to fluid forces and the resulting implications in ocular pathologies.

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Monica Farmer Cox Ohio State University

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Monica F. Cox, Ph.D., is Professor and Chair in the Department of Engineering Education at The Ohio State University. Prior to this appointment, she was a Associate Professor in the School of Engineering Education at Purdue University, the Inaugural Director of the College of Engineering's Leadership Minor, and the Director of the International Institute of Engineering Education Assessment (i2e2a). In 2013, she became founder and owner of STEMinent LLC, a company focused on STEM education assessment and professional development for stakeholders in K-12 education, higher education, and Corporate America. Her research is focused upon the use of mixed methodologies to explore significant research questions in undergraduate, graduate, and professional engineering education, to integrate concepts from higher education and learning science into engineering education, and to develop and disseminate reliable and valid assessment tools for use across the engineering education continuum.

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Abstract

The traditional engineering design process taught in universities across the country focuses on several common design steps. Often these experiences place little emphasis on creating value by defining a market opportunity or communicating the overall economic and social impact. In collaboration with KEEN, a network of thousands of engineering faculty working to unleash undergraduate engineers so that they can create personal, economic, and societal value through the entrepreneurial mindset, a large mid-western university is adding multiple entrepreneurial minded learning (EML) elements to an existing first-year course. This Work-in-Progress paper represents the first phase of a four-phase, 18-month pilot, during which we explored the impact of EML in first-year engineering classrooms on motivation and identity.

This phase used a mixed methods investigation into the current practices of five KEEN related first-year engineering programs currently incorporating EML elements into their curricula. Researchers visited each school or program and collected data via focus groups with first-year engineering faculty who implement EML in the classroom, surveys of first- and fourth-year students to assess the short- and long-term impacts of EML at it relates to motivation and identity, and observations of EML classrooms to note current engagement in courses with EML practices.

We mapped the findings from the information collected to the KEEN engineering mindset and skillsets along with the Longitudinal Model of Motivation and Identity (LMMI), which combines self-determination theory (SDT) needs (autonomy, competence, and relatedness) with possible-selves theory (PST). The LMMI served as a lens for considering the motivational and identity impacts that EML experiences have on engineering students’ motivation and identity. Our analysis included deductive coding of the focus groups followed by open coding to break down the items to better understand exactly what is contributing to student motivation and identity. We triangulated these findings with our observations and student survey data to identify common trends. Additionally, we used descriptive statistics to analyze the survey data. As this is a mixed methods study, we also employed mixing to find connections between all of our data sets.

Once mapping is complete, the results from this phase will be used to develop a set of best practices that will be incorporated into EML projects, courses, and curriculum during future phases to encourage autonomous motivation and identity development. A significant contribution of our project is the operationalization of LMMI in the context of EML along with the future curriculum that will be developed out of our work.

Desing, R., & Kajfez, R. L., & Kecskemety, K. M., & Grzybowski, D. M., & Cox, M. F. (2018, July), Mapping Entrepreneurial Minded Learning with the Longitudinal Model of Motivation and Identity in First-Year Engineering Paper presented at 2018 FYEE Conference, Glassboro, New Jersey. https://peer.asee.org/31424

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